Pomegranite Molasses At Home

Pomegranite Molasses At Home

What to do when you can’t get pomegranite molasses but have unfettered access to fresh pomegranites? Do the unthinkable and make your own. Absurdly easy to make, for flavour your molasses will outcompete any store-bought version by 1000 miles – and that’s a conservative measure

 Pomegranite molasses is a middle eastern staple used in a multitude of dishes from salads to sauces, stews and desserts. I love it in my homemade baked beans

While many recipes call for sugar I’ve never found it necessary to sweeten my molasses. On the contrary, the sweet syrup often needs balancing with lemon or lime juice. I realize I’m talking about Spanish pomegranites, so if your fruit is on the sharp side, go ahead and use your judgement to adjust the sweetness

 

METHOD

 Pomegranite molasses needs just freshly squeezed pomegranite juice and maybe a little lemon juice. Heat to boiling point and cook at medium heat until it reaches a rolling boil and the color has deepened. This can take anywhere from 30-50 minutes, depending on how deep or shallow your pan is and how thick and dark you like it. Finally adjust the taste with a little lemon or lime juice or agave syrup and when cool enough store in a jar in the refrigerator.

The recipe is for a small jar of molasses using 8 pomegranites. Double or triple it to your needs.

Check the video tutorial at the end of the recipe

Fresh Pomegranite Molasses

Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time50 mins
Total Time1 hr
Cuisine: Mediterranean, middle east, Worldwide
Keyword: fruit, no added sugar, vegan

Equipment

  • orange squeezer

Ingredients

  • 8 large pomegranites or multiples thereof
  • lemon or lime juice to taste

Instructions

  • juice the pomegranites as you would an orange. The citrus squeezing attachment of a food processor is ideal
  • Keep the seeds back and squeeze out the remaining juice using a piece of muslin or similar thin cloth. You don;t have to do this, but you;ll find there's a lot of juice still left in the seeds
  • place the pomegranite juice in a pan. A wide, shallow pan will speed up the process, but you can use any pan
  • bring the juice to a boil and let it cook at medium heat, stirring occasionally for a good 30-40 minutes. After this time look out for a rolling boil, meaning the juice has turned syrupy. If the result is too thin you can cook it some more, but if you;ve overcaramelized or even slightly burnt the molasses there's no going back
  • adjust the sweetness with a light syrup such as agave syrup, and the sharpness with lemon or lime juice to your taste. I never use a sweetener. On the contrary, I find the local pomegranites, even the pale looking ones really sweet and adust only the acidity
  • when warm store in a small jar with a good seal and keep in the refrigerator to use in your favourite recipe

Panch Phoran – Bengali Five-Spice

Panch Phoran – Bengali Five-Spice

An essential aroma in cooking from the Bengal in Northern India and Bangladesh this spice blend can be used whole or ground at different stages of cooking

Whole spices are used to season hot oil at the start of cooking. Whole or ground spices are added later to be either incorporated into the dish or to offer an aromatic top-note. Five spice also makes a fragrant rub for roasted vegetables (and meats too, I hear)

Panch Phoran

5 spices from India's Bengal
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: all
Cuisine: Bengali, Indian
Keyword: bengali, curry, indian, masala, spice-blends, spices

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp fenugreek seeds
  • 2 tbsp lovage seeds (AKA wild celery seeds)
  • or black mustard seeds
  • 2 tbsp fennel seeds
  • 2 tbsp cumin seeds
  • 2 tbsp nigella seeds (AKA black onion seeds)

Instructions

  • Put the spices in a dry jar with a tight fitting lid and give them a good shake
  • That's it!